Epidural Hematoma (quick review)

2 Dec

submitted by Christina Brown, M.D.

37860tn

Definition – Inward bending of cavarum causes bleeding when dura separates from skull:

  • Middle meningeal artery is involved in bleed >50% of time.
  • Meningeal vein is involved in 1/3.

 

Associations 

  • Mortality is 12% and is related to preoperative condition.  
  • Skull fracture is associated in 75% of cases, less commonly in children. 

 

Pediatric Considerations

  • Head injury is the most common cause of death and acquired disability in childhood.  
  • Bleeding is more likely to be venous.
  • Good outcome in 95% of children <5 yr

 

History

  • LOC: 85% will have at some point in course:
  • Only 11–30% will have a lucid interval.

 

MORE Pediatric Considerations

  • Many times the only clinical sign is drop in hematocrit (Hct) of 40% in infants.
  • Bulging fontanel with vomiting, seizures, or lethargy also suggest EDH in infants.
  • Less than 50% of children have LOC at time of injury.
  • Posterior fossa lesions are seen more commonly in children.

 

Physical Exam

  • Pupillary dilation:  Usually on same side as lesion (90%)
  • Hemiparesis >1/3:  Usually on opposite side from lesion (80%)

 

Imaging (CT Head)

  • Lenticular, biconvex hematoma with smooth borders may be seen.
  • Mixed density lesion may indicate active bleeding.
  • Most commonly seen in temporal parietal region

 

 

 

Initial Stabilization/Therapy

  • Head-injured patients have 25% improved mortality when triaged to regional trauma centers
  • Prevent hypoxia and hypotension:
    • Rapid-sequence intubation for signs of deterioration or increased intracranial pressure (ICP)
  • Perform rapid neurologic assessment

 

ED Management

Early surgical intervention (<4 hr) in comatose patients with EDH.  Nonsurgical intervention in asymptomatic patients is associated with high rate of deterioration; >30% require surgical intervention.

Control ICP

  • Prevent pain, posturing, and increased respiratory effort
  • Elevate head of bed 15–20% after adequate fluid resuscitation.
  • Controlled ventilation to PCO2 of 35–40 mm Hg (Avoid hyperventilation unless signs of brain herniation are present).

Continuous end tidal CO2 monitoring

Arterial line placement for close monitoring of MAP, PO2, PCO2

Treat HTN:  Nicardipine, Labetalol

Treat hyperglycemia if present: Associated with increased lactic acidosis and mortality in patients with TBI

Treat and prevent seizures: diazepam, levitiracetam, etc.

and once again, Early (neuro)surgical intervention


 References:

  1. Schaider, J. & Barkin, R. & Hayden, S. & Wolfe, R. & Barkin, A. & Shayne, P. & Rosen, P. (2011). Epidural Hematoma, Rosen & Barkin’s 5-Minute Emergency Medicine Consult.
  2. Bullock M R et al.: Surgical management of traumatic brain injury. Neurosurgery.2006; 58(3 Suppl):S16–S24.
  3. Marion D M.: Epidural hematoma.  In: Bradley W G: ed. Neurology in Clinical Practice,5th ed.Elsevier;2008: 54 A,B:1083–1114.
  4. Vincent J L and Berre J.: Primer on medical management of severe brain injury. Crit Care Med.2005; 33(6):1392–1399.
  5. Huh J W and Raghupathi R.: New concepts of treatment in pediatric traumatic brain injury. Anesth Clin.2009: 27(2):213–240.
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